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We used the colors from several continents to paint the Brazilian: The colors of Africa; Colors of Europe; The colors of Asia.
The combination between them spawned endless identities, cultures and accents within a single country, Brazil.

But if our diversity is abundant, why we are still unequal in opportunities?
If our diversity should be celebrated, why children who are born different do not have equal rights?

Watch the above video and respond:
Which is more beautiful smile?
Which look is more worthy?
Which love is greater?
Which life is worth more?
Is any life worth less?

The right to survive is guaranteed to all children, but a Native child is twice as likely to die than a white child.

Inequality also affects black children. They are 25% more likely to die before reaching one year old than white children.

The right to protection has no ethnicity, but poverty in childhood has a color. It Reaches 32.9% of white children and 56% of black children. Why?

The right to learn also has no color but a Native child is three times more likely to be out of school than a white child. Of the 530,000 children who are out of school today, 62% of them are blacks.

Even though they are more than 54% of all children of the nation, black and indigenous children are the most excluded.

These numbers reflect in the daily life of every child and teenager. Be them black, white or the natives who live this reality of inequality, they carry the illusion that black, white and natives should occupy different places in society. Schools, TV programs, in the streets, books and folk stories for kids are developed with twisted images of social roles according to skin color.

UNICEF mission is collaborating with countries to ensure equal rights for every child and teenager. Brazil won significant improvements in the lives of their children, but the impacts of racism still has harmful effects on them.

Children were not born discriminating. Promoting social equality is critical for the social and economic development of a country. Participate. Contribute with your behavior.

Each of us can guarantee a country equality without discrimination. Value differences in childhood is to cultivate equality.

In this new music video collaboration, 16 global artists celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The artists in the video include Yungchen Lhamo, a Tibetan musician who was born in a Chinese labor camp and at the age of 22 trekked across the Himalayas with her two-year old son to escape oppression from the Chinese regime.

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I received this letter a few hours ago, took action right away and now I’m waiting on you to do your part……

Mexico’s Attorney General’s office has identified 34 police officers who are suspects in the rape, assault and brutal treatment of dozens of women. But sheer neglect from officials in Mexico’s highest ranks has delayed justice for nearly four years.

There’s no better day than today to signal to Mexican officials that the rights of these women will never be forgotten. Help us send a tidal wave of emails supporting these women to the offices of Mexico’s President, ambassador to the U.S. and the governor of Mexico State!

Police detained the women during a local protest in May 2006. Some women who weren’t even involved in the demonstrations were swept up in the massive arrests. They were beaten and herded into police vans. On the way to prison, officers took turns sexually assaulting the women.

Nearly four years later, they are still waiting for justice.

Accountability for these crimes may be moving at a glacial speed, but your messages do have power. The former federal Attorney General had dragged his feet on this issue for months. At the time of the attacks, he was in charge of the same police officers who were implicated in the assaults. But because of you, his office was compelled to identify 34 suspects – bringing us one giant step closer to finally prosecuting those responsible.

Even though his office has now punted responsibility to the state of Mexico, which is the governor’s jurisdiction, it’s clear that we’re putting pressure on all the right places.

Help us keep the heat on Mexican officials to ensure justice for the women of Atenco!

We can’t let this opportunity slide through our fingers. The crimes have been exposed. The suspected culprits have been named. Now is the time to uphold and protect human rights!

No more sweeping brutal beatings and rapes under the rug in Mexico.
Ensure that those responsible for these crimes are brought to justice.

Thank you for standing with us,

Michael O’Reilly
Campaign Director, Individuals at Risk
Amnesty International USA

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The international event of churches committed to ending slavery is just days away!

There is still time to register your faith community and receive all the materials and resources you need to participate.

Join churches from South Africa, Poland, Thailand, Uganda, and across the globe to preach, sing, pray, worship, and act on behalf of the captives in our world.

My community is already ready!!!!

Together we’ll declare that no person in our communities or world should be for sale.

Freedom Sunday from David Hepburn on Vimeo.

From NFSC Co-Founder: Kique Bazan

Dear Friends:

What happened in Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, is nothing short of devastating. It is especially heart-wrenching for those who have seen the poverty and know the needs of the people firsthand.

Before the earthquake, Haiti was already the greatest hotbed of modern-day slavery in the region, containing an estimated 225,000 child slaves. These “restaveks” become domestic servants when their families, desperate to survive, sell them to other households. In 2008 I went to Haiti for my doctoral research and was horrified to see street children, mostly boys and some as young as six, being sold for sex at $1.75.

Since the earthquake, the news reports have revealed a reality that has turned from grim to desperate for the children of Haiti. Children are either separated from their families or orphaned, and traffickers are taking advantage of the situation. Save the Children says that one million unaccompanied children are vulnerable for trafficking in Haiti right now.

During my visit to Haiti I saw different strategies of work. I met people and organizations that are passionate about rediscovering people’s dignity, but I also experienced organizations that defined people by their victimhood. On one hand, it is important to see people’s tragedies in order to gain awareness and prevent the conditions that threaten their wellbeing. On the other, finding those stories that narrate the fulfillment of an individual’s own dreams, in the midst of tragedies, is greatly needed.

At 18-years-old, Fenol is a former “restavek” who escaped enslavement and is transforming his life. He was able to finish high school, get a job, and is preparing for college. As a result, he gained the respect of his peers and is a motivator for other restaveks to pursue their dreams. Fenol helps lead an organization composed of former slaves. These young people were deprived of the most basic human necessities, were neglected and abandoned, faced brutal violence, sexual exploitation, drug addiction, and human rights’ violations – yet they have found among each other the strength and support to improve their lives and the lives of the people around them. They created a system for long-term support and education to broaden their ability to actively participate in their own lives and future.

In the midst of the ruins, we find people like Fenol who are changing the face of Haiti by creating systems that offer concrete, positive results. While earthquakes are the products of nature, the lack of infrastructure and the enslavement of people are not. Therefore, in order to stop the proliferation of trafficking and ongoing vulnerability of children, the Not For Sale Campaign is connecting with individuals and organizations engaged on the ground in vital relief efforts.

One of the most pressing needs to address trafficking is the presence of trained volunteers who can accurately document and register vulnerable children. We are close to forging a partnership where NFSC will train volunteers in our Academy in effective mapping and documentation. Our goal is to equip at least a handful of volunteers for placements ranging from two weeks to a year in Haiti to assist with prevention efforts and to deploy their skills, resources and network to enable people’s dreams of freedom.

If you are interested in receiving training to work with Not For Sale’s efforts in Haiti, please contact us directly at: theacademy@notforsalecampaign.org

Thank you for your ongoing support as we address modern-day slavery amidst this disaster. We will continue to keep you informed as we work to develop innovative solutions to fight trafficking in Haiti.

Sincerely,

Kique Bazan
Co-founder & International Director
Not For Sale Campaign

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